Losing your driver’s license for something non-driving related makes it hard to keep a job and take care of your family.  Recent changes to the law will help break down these barriers.

Effective October 1, 2021, there are a number of new statutes that eliminate license suspensions for most failures to appear and failures to pay fines.  Those who were under these types of license suspensions when these new laws became effective should have received letters in the mail informing them that their suspensions are automatically lifted.  There are many different statutory sections of the motor vehicle code that are effected but to summarize, license restrictions are no longer permitted for:

  • Failing to answer citations for three or more parking violations, or two or more for citations that involve parking for persons with disabilities.
  • Failing to appear in response to a citation or to comply with an order or judgment, including failing to pay all fines, costs, fees, and assessments, for several civil infractions under the code.
  • Failing to appear in response to a citation or to comply with an order or judgment, including failing to pay all fines, costs, fees, and assessments, for state civil infractions under Chapter 88 of the Revised Judicature Act.
  • Failing to pay a driver responsibility fee or engage in the alternative workforce training.
  • Failing to report a change of address, falsely reporting a change of address, or reporting a change of address for someone else without their permission.
  • Perjury or making a false certification to the Secretary of State.
  • Fraudulently altering or forging documents pertaining to motor vehicles.
  • Failing to provide proof of insurance.
  • Unlawful use of a driver’s license (among other things, altering a license, having a fake or altered license, letting someone else use it or using someone else’s).
  • Making a false report of a crime or emergency at a school (e.g., a false school bomb threat).
  • Using a fake ID to buy alcohol as a minor, purchasing alcohol as a minor, being a minor in possession of alcohol.
  • Selling alcohol to a minor.
  • Open alcohol in a vehicle.
  • Using a motor vehicle without permission of its owner, but also without the intent to steal it (joyriding).
  • Malicious destruction with a vehicle of trees, shrubs, grass, turf, plants, crops, or soil.
  • Committing motor fuel theft.
  • Missing payments under a support order or obligation or for failing to comply with a parenting time order.